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Does your dog suffer from torn knee ligaments?  

Get the inside scoop on what many vets don't share with their clients. 

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  • RECEIVE KNOWLEDGE

    Learn the causes, symptoms and treatments of torn knee ligaments.

  • REALIZE OPTIONS

    Learn about the different options available: alternative treatments, surgeries, and the pros and cons of each.

  • UNDERSTAND YOUR PET

    Get the information you need to understand what your pet is going through and how he or she is feeling.

  • MAKE EMPOWERED CHOICES

    Knowledge is power. Get the tools you need to make the best choice for your pet.

What Your Vet May Not Tell You About Torn Knee Ligaments:  Understand the Options and Make the Right Choice for Your Dog

In veterinary medicine, we call a torn cruciate ligament a “cranial cruciate ligament injury of the stifle.”

What’s a stifle?

The stifle is the veterinary term for the knee.

Other Names for Cranial Cruciate Ligament Injury Include:

  • Torn ACL in dogs
  • Dog cruciate ligament tear
  • Canine torn ligament
  • Cranial cruciate ligament rupture
  • CCL disease

You need to know is the following: If your dog has a torn cruciate ligament in the stifle, your dog needs veterinary attention.

Cruciate Disease Risk Factors:

  • Breed: Rottweiler, Newfoundland, Staffordshire Terrier, Mastiff, Akita, Saint Bernard, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, and Labrador Retriever
  • Body weight: Heavier body weight applies more stress to the joints.
  • Neutering: Testosterone and estrogen play an important role in the elasticity and functional strength of connective tissue. When we neuter or spay our dogs, the hormones are subsequently removed leaving the canine cruciate ligament tight, less elastic and resilient.
  • Aging: Aging contributes to the degeneration of the ligament which is unavoidable.
  • Conformation: Refers to the shape and configuration of the skeletal structures.
  • Other orthopedic diseases: Other injuries, such as a patella luxation, can contribute to cruciate issues.
  • Inactivity: Less active dogs have decreased muscle mass, muscle strength, and ligament strength.

Some risk factors, such as body weight, age of neutering, and inactivity, are in your control.

However, other risk factors are completely out of your control.

Do your best to eliminate the risk factors.

Forget about the ones you can’t control.

Learn more about canine knee ligament issues and what you can do to help in our free ebook!

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